Archive for September, 2010



21
Sep
10

brancolina :: memory – secret cinema show


photography:©brancolina, all rights reserved

Made for Y Sin Embargo#25 :: just a memory issue.

20
Sep
10

brancolina :: oxford street #226







photography: ©brancolina, all rights reserved

10
Sep
10

Esther Stocker

Esther Stocker is Vienna-based artist, who is known for manipulating spatial geometry using the framework of the grid, both on canvas and in her 3-D installations, until the mind starts making linear connections that aren’t really there, trying to find order in the optically illusive chaos. “When you work in a very minimal way in high contrast, maybe it’s only two-dimensional, but you see it as three because you want to know what’s the figure, what’s the foreground and background,” she explains. The viewer spends time “wandering around in” the painting, trying to make sense of it. There’s a beauty in things you can’t figure out”. (edit from Monica Khemsurov’s article about Esther Stocker).










                                                        

This is a short film with Esther Stocker’s installation Abstract Thought Is A Warm Puppy, that was last year staged in C.C.N.O.A. (Center for Contemporary Non-Objective Art) in Brussels.

09
Sep
10

Jeroen Krielaars :: Moshun

Animated typography by calango.nl

08
Sep
10

Mimmo Rubino aka FlickRub aka Home Kandy :: Anamorphosis







06
Sep
10

brancolina :: wabi-sabi 侘寂


©brancolina, all rights reserved

wabi sabi 侘寂
beauty of things imperfect
beauty of things unconventional
impermanent
incomplete
modest and humble

05
Sep
10

Tony Orrico :: Penwald 4 : unison symmetry standing





Tony Orrico‘s work is breaking down the barriers between choreography and visual art. He is using movement as an instrument to create two-dimensional work and live performed installation. Movement, measurement, gravity, energy, chaos, efficiency, duration, limitation, repetition and isolation are recurring themes in his work. Sometimes the spectator is merely an observer of the artist’s slightly introverted exploit, at other times he becomes involved in the performance.

Penwald 4: unison symmetry standing is a three-hour performance in which Orrico draws on a white wall with perfectly orchestrated bilateral movements. Slowly but surely a densely woven symmetrical image emerges, which bears a strong resemblance to the two halves of our brain. Three performances from this project can be experienced live during Flux/S art festival in Eindhoven, Holland.

02
Sep
10

brancolina :: piano concert for silence

©brancolina, all rights reserved

02
Sep
10

Tommaso Nervegna :: Iannis Xenakis, Notre Dame du Haut

Iannis Xenakis (Ιωάννης Ιάννης Ξενάκης) (May 29, 1922 – February 4, 2001) was a Greek modernist composer, musical theoretician and architect. He is regarded as an important and influential composer of the twentieth century. His music theory book Formalized Music: Thought and Mathematics in Composition is regarded as a very important, if esoteric, work of 20th century music theory.

“By 1979, he had devised a computer system called UPIC, which could translate graphical images into musical results”, wrote Andrew Hugill in 2008. “Xenakis had originally trained as an architect, so some of his drawings, which he called ‘arborescences’, resembled both organic forms and architectural structures.” These drawings’ various curves and lines that could be interpreted by UPIC as real time instructions for the sound synthesis process. The drawing is, thus, rendered into a composition. Mycenae-Alpha was the first of these pieces he created using UPIC as it was being perfected. In 1982 Xenakis developed his Music Timbre and Cadence Scale which is used quantifying musical styles in modern music.

In conversation, Iannis Xenakis frequently distanced himself from being seen in too strict terms – like many other composers for whom method and structure were the easiest aspects of music to discuss verbally, he sees the role of such things as relative. One way to envisage this approach is that the method constitutes a thematic germ, a starting-point, and from there the normal musico-aesthetics, personal obsessions and practical considerations play their normal role in finishing and shaping the piece. Indeed from the 1970s onwards Xenakis’ use of this method became deeply assimilated into his general musical thinking and he reports in interviews from that time that the strict application of statistical processes was no longer necessary to produce the results he was looking for.

Xenakis appeared easily bored in interviews when people attempted to take an overly simplistic view of him as ‘complex’ – the various clichés surrounding him appeared to greatly annoy him in interview and he would frequently make recourse to the wider aesthetics of music in general and the other arts, in order to contextualise his contributions to music making. In a sense his early statements about “looking at music statistically” were a response to what he saw as the mistake of placing too much emphasis on the likely benefits of applying methodology too rigorously. It is also important to note, however, that this does not constitute any true dichotomy between Xenakis and his peers – the application of single-minded rigour to composition in post-war music was relative and momentary, and as with his own work, the poetic and aesthetic significance of the gesture as a modern equivalent to programme-music, as well as the vital role played by musicality and music-editing/shaping has been widely undervalued in favour of simplistic characterisations of such music as purely intellectual.” (Source: Wikipedia)

Official website: Iannis Xenakis








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