Archive for October, 2010



13
Oct
10

Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art :: Art by telephone(1969)

Art by Telephone:
33-1/3 RPM vinyl LP record housed in offset-printed black-and-white gatefold album cover
12 ¼ x 12 ¼ inches (closed), 12 ¼ x 24 ½ inches (open)
Published by Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago 1969

“Shortly after its opening, the Museum of Contemporary Art planned an exhibition to record the trend toward conceptualization of art. This exhibition, scheduled for the spring of 1968 and abandoned because of technical difficulties, consisted of works in different media, conceived by artists in this country and Europe and executed in Chicago on their behalf. The telephone was designated the most fitting means of communication in relaying instructions to those entrusted with fabrication of the artists’ projects or enactment of their ideas. To heighten the challenge of a wholly verbal exchange, drawings, blueprints or written descriptions were avoided.

“Art by Telephone” admits an historic precedent. In 1922 Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, then newly appointed to the Weimar Bauhaus, set out to prove to his students and fellow teachers alike that the intellectual approach to the creation of a work of art is in no way inferior to the emotional approach. Bucking the expressionist mainstream and steeping himself in the revolutionary ideas of the Russian Constructivists Malevich and Lissitzky, the new head of the metal workshop ordered from a sign manufacturer three steel panels of diminishing size covered with white porcelain enamel and bearing a simple geometric design in black, red and yellow. Rather than furnish sketches and personally supervise the execution, Moholy asked that the manufacturer take a piece of graph paper and a color chart. He then dictated these works over the telephone.

Despite the fact that Moholy-Nagy’s “telephone pictures” are widely discussed in art literature, no museum until now has been prompted by this historic act to test the potential of remote control creation on the sale of a group exhibition. Making the telephone ancillary to creation and employing it as a link between artist’s hand and material has never been attempted in any fashion.” – Jan van der Marck from the exhibition catalogue / LP jacket

On the LP the Museum’s director, Jan van der Marck, interviews by long-distance telephone artists: Siah Armajani, Richard Artschwager, John Baldessari, Iain Baxter, Mel Bochner, George Brecht, Jack Burnham, James Lee Byars, Robert H. Cumming, Francoise Dallegret, Jan Dibbets, John Giorno, Robert Grosvenor, Hans Haacke, Richard Hamilton, Dick Higgins, Davi Det Hompson, Robert Huot, Alani Jacquet, Ed Kienholz, Joseph Kosuth, Les Levine, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, Richard Serra, Robert Smithson, Guenther Uecker, Stan Van Der Beek, Bernar Venet, Frank Lincoln Viner, Wolf Vostell, William Wegman and William T. Wiley. Each was discussing with van der Marck how to execute an artwork for inclusion in the show to be fabricated by in Chicago strictly by the artist’s verbal instructions.

While the 1969 curatorial effort was conceived as an economic means to produce a large-scale exhibition, many of the artists included within the show produced succinct conceptual works that were among the first such works to be presented in a museum.

“Conceptual art as documented, recorded, manufactured or preformed in “Art by Telephone” is a further step toward the syncretism of the literary, plastic and performing arts which characterizes the 1960s. The term generally applies to those new forms of art which seem to favor intellectual premises over visual result. Those artists who have responded to the challenge to this exhibition share certain basic premises despite divergence in expression. They want to get away form the interpretation of art as specific, handcrafted, precious object. They value process over product and experience over possession… “– Jan van der Marck from the exhibition catalogue / LP jacket

10
Oct
10

thea djordjadze :: geometric sculptures

Thea Djordjadze creates sculptures, installations, paintings and drawings. She puts together a world of light shapes: her sculptures look as if a few items of furniture and architecture models dating from the 1960s had taken on an independent existence and mugged a Calder mobile. Lumps of clay on the border between being something in the process of being shaped and something that is still shapeless are stuck, in delicately balanced rhythms, between the foam objects that teeter on the most filigree of modernist legs. This art, which always looks cobbled together, provisional and like a model for something is part of a new type of aesthetics, it is an aesthetic rendition of the hope that art remains living and does not deteriorate into the type of decorative geegaw to be found at our markets. (Niklas Maak, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung)














Website: goslab.de

10
Oct
10

JEAN-JACQUES PERREY :: e.v.a. (1970)




Jean – Jacques Perrey was born in France in 1929. He was studying medicine in Paris when he met George Jenny, inventor of the Ondioline. Quitting medical school, Perrey travelled through Europe demonstrating this keyboard ancestor of the modern synthesizer. At the age of 30, Perrey relocated to New York, sponsored by Caroll Bratman, who built him an experimental laboratory and recording studio. Here he invented “a new process for generating rhythms with sequences and loops”, utilising the environmental sounds of “musique concrète.” With scissors, splicing tape, and tape recorders, he spent weeks piecing together a uniquely comique take on the future. Befriending Robert Moog, he became one of the first Moog synth musicians, creating “far out electronic entertainment”. In 1965 Perrey met Gershon Kingsley, a former colleague of John Cage. Together, using Ondioline and Perrey’s loops, they created two albums for Vanguard — The In Sound From Way Out (1966) and Kaleidoscopic Vibrations (1967). Perrey and Kingsley collaborated on sound design for radio and television advertising. Perrey returned to France, composing for television, scoring for ballet and continuing medical research into therapeutic sounds for insomniacs. (edit from Wikipedia)

Click here to read interview with Perrey.

10
Oct
10

female pioneers of electronic music

Electronic music existed much before digital era, there were many female composers who pioneered the new way of composing by experimenting with sounds and unusual instruments. They worked by splicing tape loops, distorting sounds, endless dubbing, working with huge, old-school computers and by experimenting in order to reproduce different sounds that were used to compose the music based on repetition and incredible sonic diversity. Here are some composers that marked their place in the history of experimental electronic music.

Since the 1930’s, CLARA ROCKMORE was the master of the notoriously difficult Theremin instrument, and later championed by synthesizer-creator Bob Moog. LOUIS BEBE BARRON created the first all-electronic score for the film “FORBIDDEN PLANET” (1957), using oscillated sounds and tape loops in STUDIO d’ASSAI (Paris). Danish ELSE MARIE PADE studied under musique concrete founder Pierre Schaeffer, becoming a noted composer. ELAINE RADIGUE used the Buchla and Arp synthesizers in her work, heavily influenced by Buddhist meditation and recorded with group The Lappetites. MICHELE BOKANOWSKI has composed for film, televison, and theatre. BBC RADIOPHONIC WORKSHOP (London) was created and directed by DAPHNE ORAM, inventor and sonic pioneer. She was followed by DELIA DERBYSHIRE, who brought Ron Grainer’s “DR. WHO” theme to brilliant, eerie life with her studio wizardry. MADDALENA FAGANDINI co-created the proto-Techno single “Time Beat/ Waltz In Space” (1962) with young producer George Martin under the alias ‘Ray Cathode’. GLYNIS JONES produced some of the Workshop’s classic albums like “Out Of This World” (1976). ELIZABETH PARKER scored many BBC shows including “BLAKE’S 7”, and was the person to see the Workshop out in its 1998 finale. Fluxus performance artist YOKO ONO expanded John Lennon’s mind and range with electronic music, musique concrete, and ‘happening’ experiments. COLUMBIA-PRINCETON ELECTRONIC MUSIC CENTER (New York) was a premiere focal point for international composers since the 50’s, including composer and Associate Director PRIL SMILEY. ALICE SHIELDS combined her operatic voice and poetry with the revolutionary synthesizers of the late 60’s and early 70’s. Her teacher DARIA SEMEGEN wrote traditional classical music as well as electronic. WENDY CARLOS had massive mainstream success with the all-synth “Switched On Bach”, before writing groundbreaking film scores for “A CLOCKWORK ORANGE,” “THE SHINING” and ‘TRON”. Nearby at Bell Labs, LAURIE SPIEGEL spearheaded computer graphics and software design as well as new music. Maverick ANNETTE PEACOCK went from Free Jazz piano to the first synthesizers, threading her early 70’s raps and rock with freeform electronics. Argentinian BEATRIZ FERREYRA, who also studied with Schaeffer, is an esteemed composer and teacher. SAN FRANCISCO TAPE MUSIC CENTER, The crucial West Coast electronic center produced some marvelous pieces thanks to Morton Subotnick, Terry Riley, Steve Reich and PAULINE OLIVEROS in 1962. Later on it become the CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY MUSIC (Mills College, Oakland, CA), where Oliveros was the first Director, perfecting her signal processing system for live performance. Student and now Co-Director MAGGI PAYNE trailblazed video imagery and record engineering along with her music.CYNTHIA WEBSTER played in the early synth band Triode, founded electro mag SYNAPSE, and now runs Cyndustries designing software for electronic music, such as the Zeroscillator.

Their innovations led to Progressiv Rock, Krautrock, New Wave, Coldwave, Darkwave, Electro Funk, Industrial, Techno, and Electroclash and their fringe future music is now the soundtrack of today and it’s worth checking and re-discovering … Respect!

For more info try Cyndustries‘s list of female electronic composers with direct links to their web pages.

09
Oct
10

Barbara Hepworth :: Pastorale





photography: ©brancolina

Details of Barbara Hepworth’s sculpture Pastorale (1953) from the Kröller-Müller Museum’s permanent collection.

barbarahepworth.org.uk

09
Oct
10

barbara hepworth :: winged figure


Winged Figure (1961-2), aluminium with stainless steel rods, 19 feet 3 inches in height (5.8 metres) attached to the side wall of John Lewis department store, Oxford Street/Holles street, London.

Winged Figure represents a significant moment in Barbara Hepworth’s later career as she started to move away from carving in wood and stone and began to work in metal. This was to have a radical effect on Hepworth’s sculpture, resulting in the kind of much airier, open forms that would have been almost impossible to undertake in stone or wood. In this sculpture, for example, it allowed her to experiment further with the stringed forms that had first made their appearance in her work in the early 1940s and probably derived from the influence of the sculptor Naum Gabo, a close friend from her pre-war Hampstead days and who, like Hepworth, had come down to live in St. Ives at the outbreak of the war. Gabo’s concerns were purely with geometric, constructivist forms however while in Hepworth’s work, as always, the formal idea relates to her feelings about the landscape and the figure. At that time she had written how ‘the strings were the tension I feel between myself and the sea, the wind and the hills’ and this sense of a ‘return to nature’ in her work following her settling permanently in St. Ives is the predominant characteristic of Winged Figure as well. For during these years her work had become increasingly bound up in her understanding of the Cornish landscape of the Penwith peninsular close to St. Ives and Winged Figure is very much a figure in a landscape. Its closeness to her Curved Form (Trevalgan) of 1956 certainly confirms this; a work about which Hepworth observed at the time that it had been ‘conceived standing on the hill called Trevalgan between St. Ives and Zennor. At this point, facing the setting sun across the Atlantic, where sky and sea blend with hills and rocks the forms seem to enfold the watcher and lift him toward the sky.’ (edit from Offer Waterman&co text about Winged figure)


barbarahepworth.org.uk

08
Oct
10

brancolina :: postcards for Alan Wilson






©brancolina, all rights reserved

08
Oct
10

JimJamGraphics :: LJ Kruzer : Tam


‘Tam is taken from LJ Kruzers second album, Manhood And Electronics released Summer 2009 on Uncharted Audio: unchantedaudio.com

Video by JimJamGraphics: jimjamgraphics

unchantedaudio.com
ljkruzer.co.uk
audio.ljkruzer.co.uk

06
Oct
10

Philip Glass :: opening




Click photo to visit my website

brancolina@yahoo.com

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