Archive for November, 2010



17
Nov
10

brancolina :: confrontation #2

photography:©brancolina, all rights reserved

17
Nov
10

brian barber :: formation of space

Space is open-ended, never existing on its own but only in relation to other elements. Defining space as a contained specific volume is difficult as it continuously flows through a building relative to the observer’s movements.

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Spaces are in a constant state of flux. The idealistic vision of the architect is in tension ‘with the exotic circus of real life’. The architect’s control over a design is terminated once it enters into the reality of the city, because spaces are never in isolation, but exist in relation to each other. Experiences of one space flow into the next. Edmund Bacon in one of his first essays ‘Awareness of Space as Experience‘ illustrates that ‘there is an intellectual parallel of deepening perception, which is based on becoming connected with larger and larger systems.’

* * *

Finding it difficult to confine a space let us explore what contributions alter its perception. Space is informed by enclosure, light, approach, scale, time and position. Altering just one of these conditions transforms the observer’s dialogue with reality. Rafael Moneo said in ‘An intense life and consummate work’: ‘Any construction that has been able to survive the passage of time is by definition an ongoing transformation’

* * *

Irrespective of the procession of time and centuries or a fleeting moment, how a space is perceived changes due to uncontrollable external factors conducted by the nature. The concept model begins to explore this theme. The space inside the model is constant, however its perception differs each time it is viewed. Each window into the space has a different scale, the light changes, the window size is different, as every space can be described in a series of different ways.

Edits from Brian Barber’s post to Space framed blog, that investigated the relationship between architecture and photography as an ongoing study at the School of Architecture UCD

16
Nov
10

Felice Varini :: perspective-localized paintings

Felice Varini is the master of anamorphosis style of painting. He applies geometric shapes to architectural spaces in perspective-localized manner, an image appears in its true shape only when viewed from a very specific spot. These are extracts from Gil Dekel’s interview with Felice Varini, where he explains his artistic point of view.

G.D.: You do not paint on canvas but rather on architectural and urban landscapes such as buildings, walls, streets. Your works have only one view-point, or a vantage-point, from which the viewer can see the complete painting, which is usually a simple geometric form (a circle, square, triangle). From other view points the viewer will see ‘broken’ fragmented shapes. Why do you use this simple geometric shapes, as well as basic colors?
F.V.: If you draw a circle on a flat canvas it will always look the same. The drawn circle will retain the flatness of the canvas. This kind of working is very limiting to me, so I project a circle onto spaces, onto walls or mountain sides, and then the circle’s shape is altered naturally because the ‘canvas’ is not flat. A mountain side has curves that affect the circle, and change the circle’s geometry. So, I do not need to portray complicated forms in my paintings. I can just use the simplicity of forms, because the reality out there distorts forms in any case, and creates variations on its own accord. The same goes for colors. Usually I use one color only, and the space takes care of altering the color’s hue. For example, if I use one type of red color on a mountain side, the result is many kinds of red, depending on the mountain’s surface and the light conditions. Sunlight will affect the different areas on the surface and the same red color may become stronger or darker or clearer in certain areas, depending on how the sun rays hit the surface. The sky can be bright or dark. And if the surface has its own color or a few colours then that will affect the red that I apply on it. So, I do not need to use sophisticated colors. The reality exists with its own qualities, shapes, colours and light conditions. What I do is simply add another shape and color in response to that.

G.D. : Are your paintings meant to be permanent in the space where they were created?
F.V. : Once I make a work it can be removed and remade in a different place, as long as certain guidance is followed. I do not make an object and move it, but I move the concept, and can remake it in the new space, in the same way that there is a written play and a theatre company can stage it in a few different ‘environmental theatres’.

G.D. : Did you ever consider to construct or create the space itself?
F.V. : No, because I am not an architect. I am a painter, and painting is my main concern. I do not intend to create the reality or manipulate it. The reality is complex enough. Every day you can discover something new around you. It is an ongoing surprise looking at old churches, sub-stations, houses. There are many types of architecture around the world, with new relations and new perspectives created all the time, and once I choose a space I start a new thinking process with it.

G.D. : You work directly on space but you do not define yourself as an installation artist.
F.V. : I am a painter. I consider the reality itself to be the installation and I work on that installation with paint. The reality is an installation work which belongs to all of us and I am working with it or sometimes against it, in order to reach for new forms, new lights and new colors.

G.D. : How would you describe your relation with the space that you paint?
F.V. : With my paintings I am trying to discover more things that we cannot normally see. The vantage point of the works is really very fragile. It is a mechanical point of view in a way, it does not encompass reality. In reality our eyes move all the time, and we cannot see with our eyes like the camera does, taking snapshots. We cannot retain a freeze frame with our eyes, so it is difficult for anyone to stand at the exact vantage point of my paintings. For me, the work is outside the vantage point, where reality allows for all shapes to live. I find it very limiting to paint on a canvas which is closed within a frame of four sides. There is no relation to reality there. When I experience reality outside I do not know where it starts and where it ends. It is open, just like my work.

For more info: felicevarini.org

15
Nov
10

Kilian Rüthemann :: architectural interventions/sculptures

‘Architectural spaces and the appearance of building materials are the two poles between which Kilian Rüthemann develops his sculptural interventions. His point of departure is usually a concrete place whose tectonic shell provides him with the occasion to reshape it. Rüthemann works with simple substances, such as plaster, sugar or bitumen, often changing their aggregate state in the course of the creative process. Plaster is mixed with water, sugar melted with heat and then broken up when it has cooled. This gives rise to works that testify to their own mutability and transience, that occasionally embed themselves in the existing architecture, but sometimes also thwart it. By handling these simple materials in different ways, Rüthemann repeatedly tests their formal and sculptural potential. He avails himself of their variableness to reorganise space and surprise the visitors with new formations.’ Stefanie Böttcher

ruethemann.net



14
Nov
10

Marike Schuurman :: shifting


Video work Shifting from Marike Schuurman, click on image to watch it.



12
Nov
10

brancolina :: silent obstacle

photography:©brancolina, all rights reserved

11
Nov
10

antony gormley :: breathing room 3

Breathing Room III is a giant installation of connected cubic ‘space frames’, that not accidentally resemble the computer matrix landscape from the ’80s sci-fi film Tron. The installation exists of 15 interconnecting photo-luminescent rectangular frames. Every ten minutes the room is filled for 10 seconds with an intense burst of light to ‘re-energize’ the photo-luminescent frames, that give the viewer an intensive experience of the sculptured space.

Antony Gormley: “Homo sapiens is spending more and more of his time seated, looking at a computer monitor, interpreting the world and relating to it entirely in terms of meta-language. We spend more time relating to the material world through the digital culture we have surrounded ourselves with, than we do directly with the elemental world. These are all evocations of us now: you may not like them, you may resist them, you may feel this is just ugly, clumsy stuff and that it doesn’t touch you, but I am trying to find the objective correlative of us now and for me, this is it. (…) We are minds enclosed in bodies and our bodies are enclosed in architecture. The reconciliation of mind with artificial environment is exactly what this whole installation is about.”

antonygormley.com






08
Nov
10

carsten nicolai :: syn chron

photography ©sato sugar

Carsten Nicolai’s installation Syn chron is a symbiosis of light, sound and architecture. A large 14m wide and 4m high polyhedron is designed by analyzing the crystal, it is covered with a semi-transparent material, that has a special honeycomb structure to permeate through image projections. On the surface are fixed many small speakers, while particle-like images (on six white-laser projectors) synchronize and change with abstract electronic sounds programmed by Carsten Nicolai in collaboration with Nibo. Visitors could freely experience this work’s resonance while moving about inside and outside the installation. The impression of the space is constantly generated in the process of visual and acoustical perceptive symbiosis.

Carsten Nicolai: concept, composition
Finn Geipel & Giulia Andi, LIN: architecture
Werner Sobek: supporting structure
David Letellier: artistic and architectural assistance
JENOPTIK AG: laser sources
LaserAnimation SOLLINGER GmbH: laser technology, programming
ELAC Electroacustic GmbH: audio technology
Nibo: sound programming
Rob Feigel: technical production
Carsten Koppe, Knut Kruppa: production team

carstennicolai.de

08
Nov
10

Atelier Tekuto :: mineral house

The growing trend towards sophisticated individual living solutions for singles is making intelligently designed small houses and apartments one of the most interesting architectural sectors. It is no surprise that numerous successful examples of such designs come from Japan, where densely populated urban environment has since long been influencing developing of buildings on a minimum space into highly impressive architectural art.

Mineral house is a creation of the Japanese architect Yasuhiro Yamashita from Atelier Tekuto. It is an edgy, sculptural, asymmetric residential house situated near the center of Tokyo, whose lines are reminiscent of a large crystal or mineral. The building’s space covers an area of just 50m2, but despite its very modest dimensions the inner space looks surprisingly spacious thanks to the special staggering of the living levels, ceiling breakthroughs and strategically placed window openings at various angles. This house is a futuristic and elegant example of the contemporary Japanese minimalism and it is equally impressive both in its appearance and functionality. More info on tekuto2.squarespace.com





photography ©atelier tekuto




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