Archive for December, 2010



11
Dec
10

katharina sieverding :: hybrid image surfaces

Transformer (1973); film stills from projection, dimensions variable
Image © Klaus Mettig, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Berlin; © Katharina Sieverding VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Berlin

Weltlinie (1999), A / D / A Process, Acrylic, Steel; 190 x 125 cm
Image © Katharina Sieverding, Courtesy Galerie Christian Lethert, Köln

Encode 14 (2006), A/D/A Process, Acrylic, Steel; 275 x 375 cm
Image © Katharina Sieverding, Courtesy Galerie Christian Lethert, Köln

Katharina Sieverding characterizes her works as “hybrid image surfaces and spaces on the border of truth and fiction, iconoclasm and the pictorial turn.” Sieverding’s work was almost from the very beginning virtually antipodal to the traditional definition of photography. In the process of creating her often monumental images, the artist took paths that were radical in technical, thematic, and formal terms, using a variety of techniques of reproduction and a large reservoir of images that the artist found or generated herself. She already developed her significant style in the late 1960s as a student of Joseph Beuys, when she began working with photographic techniques. Over the course of 40 years, Sieverding’s work, with its central basic issue of “identity as individuality and collective individual,” has unarguably always taken pioneering positions and exerted a great deal of influence on contemporary photographic art, anticipating and bringing about many developments. (edit from re-title)

Katharina Sieverding’s „exhibition Projected Data Images (2010) was recently organized at I.M.A.I. (Inter Media Art Institute) in Düsseldorf as a part of the Quadriennale 2010.

11
Dec
10

votredame :: love letters


11
Dec
10

roni horn :: visions captured in text sculptures

Key and cue No. 895: A CLOUD WITHDREW FROM THE SKY (1994)

Key and cue, No. 1484: WE SHALL FIND THE CUBE OF THE RAINBOW (1994)

White Dickinson: TO COWER BEFORE A FLOWER IS PERHAPS UNWISE (2006)

Key and cue No. 1270: IS HEAVEN A PHYSICIAN? (2005)

Thicket No.1: TO SEE A LANDSCAPE AS IT IS WHEN I’M NOT THERE (1989-90)

Roni Horn’s embedded-text sculptures are made with the words cast in plastic in rectangular aluminum bars, the square cross-sections of which would measure two inches per side. Despite their tidy and direct presentation and the simplicity of their conceit, these are enigmatic works that speak to the difficulty of marrying sculptural and literary experience. Physical orientation becomes a key factor. Horn leans the works against the wall, positioning them not as lines of text but as pure objects, like planks that have no proper top or bottom, front or back. To make out the texts, viewers must navigate around the works; the act of reading, then, becomes physical, as the three-dimensional phrases, depending on which of their sides the viewer faces, appear variously right-side up or upside down, backward or forward, or reduced to stripes. Were they on pages, one would just read them, but here the rules of art viewing intervene, she melds language into physical form that may be both seen and read, from one angle as abstract pattern and from another as a provocative phrase. Yet what seems distancing or obfuscatory also results in aggressive engagement with the words. Minimalism’s reductive geometry, historically employed to isolate the specificity of the object, here yields the specificity of the text.” (edit from Christopher Miles’ article “Roni Horn in Gagosian gallery”, ArtForum)

RONI HORN: biography and exhibitions info (edit from Xavier Hufkens gallery, Brussels)

11
Dec
10

artpopulus :: barbara kruger video slideshow + quotes

Power is the most free-flowing element in society, maybe next to money, but in fact they both motor each other. And it’s everywhere. And it’s in this room right now, it’s at every dinner table, every board room, every bedroom … every social situation is rife with the consequences of power. And I feel compelled to address that, because it is the major constituent in determining what our lives feel like, what our every-days feel like, what our days and nights feel like.

Words are powerful, and we speak them every moment, so why not exercise that medium? But I’m really interested in questions more than answers. Everybody’s got answers, and I think it’s more generative and engaging for me to think about questions and to think about doubt. Not to the point that it becomes crippling and self-destructive, but it’s a definite balancing force. Power slices in lots of ways, you know. And it can deal with the inequities of money; it can deal with the inequities of color; it can deal with the inequities of gender. And how some voices have been unheard, and some faces unseen, and I’m interested in how that plays out in culture, and how it changes, and how that change changes culture, and how America is a different place now than it was thirty years ago because of those changes, and how those changes in fact become [of] global and not just national interest. But we’ve seen how the battles around difference, around sexuality, around color, around nationalism, are daily changing the character and the balance of power globally.

Pictures and words seem to become the rallying points for certain assumptions. There are assumptions of truth and falsity and I guess the narratives of falsity are called fictions. I replicate certain words and watch them stray from or coincide with the notions of fact and fiction to suggest changes, and to resist what I feel are the tyrannies of social life on a certain level.

10
Dec
10

barbara kruger :: past / present / future


BK1

BK 2

BK 3



photography:©brancolina



Fragments of Barbara Kruger’s installation Past/present/future from the exhibition Taking Place at The Temporary Stedelijk museum in Amsterdam.

Barbara Kruger’s work with pictures and words addresses mass culture’s representations of power, identity and sexuality. As she has stated, “I work with pictures and words because they have the ability to determine who we are, what we want to be and what we become.” The range of Kruger’s works is broad—from photographic prints on paper and vinyl to videos, room-size installations, public commissions, printed matter, and a variety of merchandise. Using the language of direct address and words like “you,” “me,” “we,” and “they,” her works reach out into the social space of the spectator. In this installation, designed especially for the building’s largest gallery known as the Hall of Honor, Kruger wraps the floor and walls with printed texts that “speak” directly and loudly to the spectator in a chorus of voices. Her provocative, emotionally charged statements about how people regard and treat each other disrupt the decorum of a traditional museum space. Bringing the world into her work and her work into the world, she confronts stereotypes and clichés, shattering them with a rigorous critique, a generous empathy and a sharp wit. (edit from the Temporary Stedelijk museum’s website).

www.stedelijk.nl
www.barbarakruger.com

08
Dec
10

Ars Electronica Futurelab and Klaus Obermaier :: Apparition

APPARITION is a compelling dance and media performance that successfully uses innovative technology to give dancers the possibility to interact with image and music. Click here to watch a short video.

Klaus Obermaier’s dance/media performances D.A.V.E. and VIVISECTOR have become a world famous thanks to a unique combination of dance and video, but APPARITION goes one step further: sophisticated interactive technology releases the performer from the determination of set choreography and generate the visual content in real-time. The goal was to create an interactive system that is much more than simply an extension of the performer, but a potential performing partner. Computational processes that model and simulate real-world physics create a kinetic space where the beauty and dynamics of the human body and its movement quality are extended and transferred into the virtual world. These two main areas of research, the interactive digital system as performance partner and the creation of an immersive kinetic space, form the artistic framework for APPARITION. (edit from Klaus Obermaier’s website)

Idea, concept, direction, visuals, music: Klaus Obermaier
Concept, interactive design, technical development: Peter Brandl, Christopher Lindinger, Jing He (Ars Electronica Futurelab, A), Hirokazu Kato (Osaka University, J)
Choreographer and performer: Desirée Kongerod, Robert Tannion
Dramaturgy: Scott deLahunta
Realised in the framework of DAMPF_lab, a joint project of Tanz Performance Köln, Animax Multimedia Theater Bonn, V2_Lab Rotterdam, Ars Electronica Futurelab Linz.

The Ars Electronica Center, Linz (Austria)
Klaus Obermaier website


“In the center of my work stands the interaction between humans and new technologies/virtual environments. As this is a question of our times and the future, I feel very natural in using and fusing these technologies with performance and hence research the consequences and possibilities that come out of that question. The dance should work on its own, but also seamlessly fuse and interact with the digital environment that inspires dancers for improvisation.” Klaus Obermaier

07
Dec
10

L’ange Carasuelo :: Interactive wall opening

07
Dec
10

Willem van Weeghel :: Dynamic Structure 1586

05
Dec
10

Surabhi Saraf :: fold – early test 2




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brancolina@yahoo.com

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