Posts Tagged ‘london

04
Jul
11

brancolina :: 6 more place in london











photography©brancolina2011

Details of the façade construction from the office building situated at 6 More place in London, designed by Foster and partners architects.

02
May
11

brancolina :: london : red bus













photography ©brancolina, all rights reserved

02
May
11

pirate technics :: urban fox








Urban fox is a giant sculpture created out of straw bales by Pirate Technics (Mike de Butts & Alex Geldenhuys) as part of the Southbank Centre’s 60th anniversary celebration of the Festival of Britain. It is situated on the Queen Elizabeth Hall’s Waterloo Bridge Terrace and it will stay there until 4 September 2011.

southbankcentre.co.uk
piratetechnics.com

02
May
11

brancolina :: the scream

 

photography ©brancolina, all rights reserved

28
Jan
11

brancolina :: laban reflections

 
Repetitive reflections on the windows of the Laban center for contemporary dance in Deptford (London, UK) designed by Herzog and De Meuron.
 
 

13:15:45

 
 

13:18:12

 
 

13:25:04

 
 

13:19:55

photography ©brancolina2010

17
Jan
11

brancolina :: exposed

©brancolina, all rights reserved

09
Oct
10

barbara hepworth :: winged figure


Winged Figure (1961-2), aluminium with stainless steel rods, 19 feet 3 inches in height (5.8 metres) attached to the side wall of John Lewis department store, Oxford Street/Holles street, London.

Winged Figure represents a significant moment in Barbara Hepworth’s later career as she started to move away from carving in wood and stone and began to work in metal. This was to have a radical effect on Hepworth’s sculpture, resulting in the kind of much airier, open forms that would have been almost impossible to undertake in stone or wood. In this sculpture, for example, it allowed her to experiment further with the stringed forms that had first made their appearance in her work in the early 1940s and probably derived from the influence of the sculptor Naum Gabo, a close friend from her pre-war Hampstead days and who, like Hepworth, had come down to live in St. Ives at the outbreak of the war. Gabo’s concerns were purely with geometric, constructivist forms however while in Hepworth’s work, as always, the formal idea relates to her feelings about the landscape and the figure. At that time she had written how ‘the strings were the tension I feel between myself and the sea, the wind and the hills’ and this sense of a ‘return to nature’ in her work following her settling permanently in St. Ives is the predominant characteristic of Winged Figure as well. For during these years her work had become increasingly bound up in her understanding of the Cornish landscape of the Penwith peninsular close to St. Ives and Winged Figure is very much a figure in a landscape. Its closeness to her Curved Form (Trevalgan) of 1956 certainly confirms this; a work about which Hepworth observed at the time that it had been ‘conceived standing on the hill called Trevalgan between St. Ives and Zennor. At this point, facing the setting sun across the Atlantic, where sky and sea blend with hills and rocks the forms seem to enfold the watcher and lift him toward the sky.’ (edit from Offer Waterman&co text about Winged figure)


barbarahepworth.org.uk

07
Jul
10

Jean Nouvel :: summer pavilion for the Serpentine Gallery

French architect Jean Nouvel has designed the pavilion for the Serpentine Gallery, a striking all-red structure set amid the sun-baked greenery of Kensington Gardens in London. This is the 10th realized summer project from the Serpentine Gallery and it follows in the footsteps of previous architects like Oscar Niemeyer, Zaha Hadid, Toyo Ito and Rem Koolhaas. The Serpentine pavilion is traditionally designed by an architect who has yet to build or complete a building in Britain. The 2010 pavilion, however, is only just ahead of the game: this autumn sees the opening of Nouvel’s One New Change, a controversial shopping and office complex to the east of St Paul’s Cathedral.

What inspired this rhapsody in red? “It was that moment,” says Jean Nouvel, “when the summer sun catches you full in the eyes and, as you blink, the world dissolves into red. In one way, the pavilion is a sun machine, a way of directing sunlight. In another, it is a fragile flower that rises in the park in the summer sun, wilts in the autumn and then vanishes. Of course, red is also the colour of London in some ways – the buses, the pillar boxes, the soldiers for the Queen – but mostly red is about the sun. I want it to catch and filter emotions, to be a little place of warmth and delight. For an architect, it’s always a pleasure to work with a programme that has no great consequences – the pavilion comes, the pavilion goes. It leaves an impression, echoes of emotion, nothing more. In this way, the architect is free to be the artist. It’s a building from a dream that allows us to have some little, I hope happy, sensations. It’s architecture on holiday.”

More info on the Serpentine Gallery website.

Photography: ©2010brancolina, all rights reserved




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